Print this page.

2018 Survey of Candidates for Governor of Iowa

2018 Iowa Cancer Consortium Gubernatorial Survey Cover Page
Click to download an electronic version of the survey results.


Disclaimer

The Iowa Cancer Consortium is a nonpartisan organization. Responses included in this document were provided directly by candidates and were not edited. This document is in no way an endorsement for any 2018 gubernatorial candidate. This guide was produced for informational purposes only.
 

About the Iowa Cancer Consortium

The Iowa Cancer Consortium is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization located in Coralville, Iowa. The Consortium works towards reducing cancer incidence and mortality in Iowa through collaborative partnerships that strengthen cancer prevention, screening, treatment, quality of life, and health equity for all Iowans. The Consortium’s activities are guided by the 2018-2022 Iowa Cancer Plan that serves as a road map for cancer control work. The Iowa Cancer Consortium and its partners of health care providers, public health professionals, caregivers, researchers, cancer survivors, volunteers, and many other Iowans work together to achieve the vision of an Iowa where cancer is not a burden.
 

2018 Candidates And Affiliations

Marco Battaglia, Libertarian 
State Senator Nate Boulton, Democrat (*Note: Boulton has suspended his campaign.) 
Cathy Glasson, Democrat
Fred Hubbell, Democrat
Dr. Andy McGuire, Democrat
John Norris, Democrat
Jake Porter, Libertarian
Kim Reynolds, Republican
Ross Wilburn, Democrat
 

Survey Topics

Click on a topic to jump to that portion of the survey.


Funding For Cancer Programs

Do you plan to increase state funding for cancer prevention, control, and research? If yes, how would you do this?

Marco Battaglia, Libertarian

Response provided by candidate: No. I think we can reduce instances of cancer dramatically by looking at what people consume and by encouraging people to get active.

State Senator Nate Boulton, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: Yes. We can better fund our research with state university investments as well as provide better funding of our research dollars used at the UIHC by prioritizing those investments. We can also do better in the delivery of preventative education and care and treatment services by restoring public health funds, support for organizations that provide cancer screenings, and reversing the privatized Medicaid changes that have threatened the future of health care in Iowa by making it hard to maintain and improve health services in our state. 

Cathy Glasson, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: Yes. Cancer research should be a priority for our public universities, as a Registered Nurse, future Governor, this is important to me. Early treatment and prevention will save lives and reduce costs.

Fred Hubbell, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: As governor, I will work to ensure Iowa’s health services and programs have the support and resources they need, to provide Iowans the health care and treatment they deserve. This starts with reversing the privatization of Medicaid that has shuttered care facilities, and restoring funding for Planned Parenthood which provides cancer screenings and preventative services for thousands of Iowans. Additionally, Iowa universities conduct an array of cancer and treatment research, but year after year of funding cuts could put a halt on research advancements. As governor, I would end these cuts and begin restoring resources that our education institutions need.

Dr. Andy McGuire, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: I absolutely plan to boost funding for this important priority, especially for the research sector so Iowa can be a leader in the search for 21st century cures. And I’ll use the 2018-2022 Iowa Cancer Plan as a roadmap as well as consulting with the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, oncologists and health care workers and our regent universities. We can fund these increases by getting rid of the tax giveaways the Reynolds administration has consistently pushed for large out of state corporations that offer no benefit to Iowans. These giveaways are forecast to total $400 to $500 million a year. We need to make the University of Iowa’s Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center a national leader that will attract not only the best doctors and researchers to Iowa City, but also form the backbone of a strong industry that can create jobs for Iowans. I’ve served on the University of Iowa’s College of Public Health’s Board of Advisors and have seen firsthand the needs of both this organization and Iowa’s entire cancer research and prevention community. I’ll use that experience and my time as a doctor and healthcare leader to take a comprehensive approach to public health that will make critical challenges such as bolstering cancer prevention, control, and research and ending our mental health crisis priorities in Iowa.

John Norris, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: Over the past several years, former Governor Terry Branstad and current Governor Kim Reynolds have given away hundreds of millions of dollars to private companies in the form of tax credits and other tax incentives. Those decisions have brought very few benefits to average Iowans and have forced policymakers to cut funding for critical programs and priorities particularly health care. The administration’s decision to privatize the state’s Medicaid system and shutter mental health facilities have undermined the support network hundreds of thousands of Iowans rely upon for their health care needs. Here is one example of their failure. In the most recent quarter, the Medicaid privatization scheme provided tobacco cessation services to a paltry 1,166 Iowans. We can and should do better than that. As governor, I will be committed to prioritizing the needs of patients and providers over the bottom lines of insurance companies. By reforming and in some cases eliminating the state’s out of control tax credit program, we will be able to free up resources to fund critical cancer related services particularly expanded tobacco cessation initiatives and education programs that raise awareness of self examinations, vaccines that can help prevent certain types of cancer, the importance of healthy lifestyles, sun safety, cancer screenings and treatment options, and more.

Jake Porter, Libertarian

This candidate did not respond.

Kim Reynolds, Republican

This candidate did not respond.

Ross Wilburn, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: Yes, I would push to increase the Iowa Cigarette Excise Tax, as well as the Iowa Other Tobacco Products Excise Tax. These two taxes are directly related to products contributing to preventable cancers, so it makes sense that these would be revenue sources for the 2018-2022 Iowa Cancer Plan, which I support. I have a history of taking actions relevant to Goal #2 of the Cancer plan: “Decrease tobacco and nicotine use and exposure.” On November 27, 2001, I was on the Iowa City Council that approved a smoking ban in restaurants by a 4-3 affirmative vote (I voted yes), which was before the statewide smoking ban. After the statewide ban passed, in 2008, I was on the Iowa City Council that unanimously expanded a smoking ban ordinance that expanded on the Statewide Smokefree Air Act to include city-owned parking ramps, the municipal airport, the downtown pedestrian mall, and special events downtown like the festivals and parade.

Return to Top



Tobacco Prevention And Control

Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the United States. Smoking increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. Lung cancer is the number one cancer killer in Iowa. The CDC recommends that the state of Iowa spends $30.1 million on tobacco prevention and control. In 2017, Iowa was funded at $5.2 million.

As governor, would you commit to funding tobacco prevention and control in Iowa at CDC-recommended level? If yes, how would you do this?

Marco Battaglia, Libertarian

Response provided by candidate: No. I think we can reduce instances of cancer dramatically by looking at what people consume and by encouraging people to get active.

State Senator Nate Boulton, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: Yes. Dollars spent today on these programs mean saving future dollars, so it is not just the moral thing to do, but also the fiscally responsible approach. It simply means making the quality of life for Iowans, rather than the quantity of corporate giveaways and exemptions, our budgeting priority. 

Cathy Glasson, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: Yes. Through the tobacco settlement that should be earmarked for tobacco prevention.

Fred Hubbell, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: Tobacco prevention programs and control have been incredibly effective at reducing and discouraging individuals, predominantly young people, from becoming addicted to tobacco. These are successful programs that deserve to be supported. As governor, I will work to ensure tobacco prevention and programs like it, that serve a good return to Iowans, are supported.

Dr. Andy McGuire, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: I would commit to increasing tobacco prevention funding to recommended levels, and again I would use revenue gained from ending wasteful corporate tax giveaways to pay for it. In addition, Iowa’s tobacco tax has not been increased in more than a decade and sits over 20% below the national average. I’d be open to ensuring we maintain parity with other states in this tax both to raise revenue to prevent tobacco use and deter Iowans from smoking. We need leadership that won’t be afraid to stand up to the tobacco companies and do what is right for Iowans’ health, and as a doctor I fully understand the dangers of tobacco use. Over 18% of Iowa adults smoke, as well as 10% of high school students – figures that are still too high. Smoking adds $1.28 billion to health care costs in Iowa each year, and we lose $1.21 billion in collective productivity. Reducing this drag on our economy and public health resources will more than make up for any additional funds spent on tobacco prevention, while keeping Iowans healthier.

John Norris, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: As governor, science and research will guide my decisions particularly when it comes to health related matters. Part of my responsibility as chief executive of Iowa will be to provide residents across the state with the information they need to make fully informed decisions about their health and health care. I support increasing the amount of money the state spends to reach the CDC recommended $30.1 million and fully fund tobacco prevention and control. With Iowa’s current budget challenges, we may need to provide these increases over the course of three to five years in order to reach those levels. However, I am committed to reversing the failed approach of our current governor who has offered hundreds of millions of dollars in tax credits and other tax incentives to private companies that provide very few benefits to Iowans across the state. By reforming our tax credit system, I believe we can free up dollars that can be allocated to critical priorities such as this. I would also be in favor of increasing the tax on tobacco products As noted in the previous answer, the governor’s decision to privatize the state’s Medicaid system has stalled meaningful tobacco cessation efforts. The managed care organizations administering the program have offered cessation programs to only 1,166 Iowans. These so-called value added services are not providing much value at the moment. As governor, I am committed to ending the failed privatization experiment and reforming our state’s tax credits to free up resources, which working together will help the state reduce tobacco use in a more meaningful way.

Jake Porter, Libertarian

This candidate did not respond.

Kim Reynolds, Republican

This candidate did not respond.

Ross Wilburn, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: As governor, I would commit to increasing funds towards the goal recommended by the CDC. I have to be honest with you and we all have to be honest and recognize that the state budget is a mess on the revenue side, due to the accumulation of irresponsible corporate tax credits given by the past two governor’s administrations. They didn’t set up parameters for reviewing the medium to long term success and sustainability of those tax credits. As a start, I can push to increase the Iowa Cigarette Excise Tax, as well as the Iowa Other Tobacco Products Excise Tax to begin to move the needle towards the #30.1 million. I would put some budgetary measures into place to review corporate tax incentives to project and ensure that we are getting a positive and sustainable return on our investment of the tax credits, in order to have revenue to invest in prevention, screening and especially research.

Return to Top


Ensuring Iowans’ Access To Care

Many Iowans face cancer health disparities based on where they live, their racial or ethnic identity, gender, sexual orientation, religion and/or numerous other factors. 

As governor, what specific steps would you take towards ensuring that all Iowans have access to cancer prevention, early detection, treatment, and quality-of-life services?

Marco Battaglia, Libertarian

Response provided by candidate: I would phase out subsidies that encourage obesity and foster an environment where people can pay cash for care.

State Senator Nate Boulton, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: Community-based health care is the most reasonable accessible care for Iowans. As providers are threatened with the prospect of reducing services particularly in rural settings do to budget concerns directly tied to privatized Medicaid, more Iowans will simply go without services altogether. We have to make securing our Medicaid system a real priority, and I’ve co-sponsored legislation to do just that. We also need to restore funds to Planned Parenthood, one of the top providers of health care services for the LBGTQ community and a key part of early detection for women at risk of developing cancer with timely screenings.

Cathy Glasson, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: The best way to make sure rural areas have access to care and can afford it, is by passing a universal single payer healthcare system in Iowa. We need to make sure we remove the disparities between rural/urban, white/black, rich/poor and the best way to do that is a Medicare for All plan at the Federal level and if they fail to act, we will pass a single payer system right here in Iowa. 

Fred Hubbell, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: As governor, I will work to ensure every Iowan has access to the health care they need, and that’s why I am firmly committed to reverse the privatization of Medicaid, which has been a complete disaster and reduced care for thousands, and restore funding for Planned Parenthood, that provides affordable cancer services and care to thousands of Iowans. Additionally, while Governor Reynolds signs legislation allowing “non-insurance” insurance plans to skirt ACA regulations, as governor, I will work to ensure all Iowa insurance plans comply with federal guidelines so Iowans cannot be denied treatment or care due to a pre-existing medical condition, or be denied coverage for cancer treatments.

Dr. Andy McGuire, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: As both a doctor and a healthcare executive, I’ve been working on this issue throughout my entire career. We must start by ensuring we adequately fund our public health system and infrastructure, including cancer research and prevention so that all Iowans, no matter where they live, have access to the services they need. Quality preventive care is the best way to keep Iowans healthy, and smart investments now will pay off with reduced costs, healthier citizens, and better quality services later. Fixing our broken Medicaid system, which the Reynolds-Branstad administration has ruined by turning it over to out-of-state private companies that can make a profit off it, is also a key component of this goal. While those steps will play a large role in expanding access by themselves, we must then take a comprehensive look at resources available in underserved communities to make sure there are no gaps in regional health systems. A critical component will be reducing the risk of losing our rural hospitals, which are currently receiving insufficient funding and reimbursement rates under Medicaid privatization. Finally, we must ensure our health care professionals are trained in dealing with Iowans of all backgrounds, so all individuals can receive quality care, no matter their background, race, sexuality, gender identity, or community.

John Norris, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: Today, there are significant gaps in the types of services available to Iowans. Too often, those living in rural communities have far fewer health care options and may be forced to travel long distances in order to effectively manage their health needs. Of course, other gaps exist as well, including those noted in the question such as gender, sexual orientation, race, and more. It’s been said a million times, but I believe health care is a right that all Iowans and all Americans should enjoy regardless of their background or where they live. Unfortunately, Republicans in Iowa have spent the past several years limiting health care options particularly for lower income Iowans who rely on Medicaid or Planned Parenthood. The 2018-2022 Iowa Cancer Plan provides an effective roadmap on the steps we should take in order to expand access to cancer prevention, early detection, treatment, and quality of life services. I strongly support expanding the use of telemedicine to connect Iowans to health care experts and health care services more efficiently. We should also take steps immediately to provide free or reduced cost cancer services to those who have gaps in their health plans or are now uninsured. Working with community leaders and academic institutions, we should identify better ways to provide translation for patients so they understand fully their health care options.

Jake Porter, Libertarian

This candidate did not respond.

Kim Reynolds, Republican

This candidate did not respond.

Ross Wilburn, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: Ensuring a welcoming and inclusive state is one of the tenets of our “Let’s Be Iowa Campaign” for governor and governance. So, access to healthcare in an equitable way is critical in order for all Iowans to have as high a quality of life as possible. Undoing privatized Medicaid is one step that I will take as governor. Increasing funding is another. But it can’t just be about more state funding. I would promote strengthening partnerships between IA Department of Education and IA Public Health with health education initiatives. I would fund and promote creative projects like partnerships between cities and counties with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach through their Local Foods and Master Gardener programs to help link healthy foods and nutrition to Medically Underserved Areas (MUA’s) and Medically Underserved Populations (MUP’). I would work to repeal Iowa’s English Only Law, which while mainly symbolic, doesn’t help with trust and understanding with immigrant populations that may not read English. Many school districts have more than 50 languages being spoken and health and nutrition information needs to be understood for all our prevention efforts. Farm workers for example, need to be able to read warning labels and understand pesticide application before using agricultural pesticides, which could create an environmental health issue. We can explore transportation options like the possibility of working with the Regional Councils of Governments (COG’s) to see if we can open up a partnership with the paratransit systems for getting cancer patients undergoing treatments from the rural areas to our cancer treatment centers, to reduce the number of MUA’s. Finally, incentivizing training (like ISU’ Extension and Outreach’s Navigating Difference training) for medical professionals to approach working with communities from a cultural humility perspective.

Return to Top



The 2018-2022 Iowa Cancer Plan And Policy

The 2018-2022 Iowa Cancer Plan outlines the roadmap to reducing the burden of cancer through prevention, screening, treatment, quality of life, and health equity interventions and partnerships. Our goals are to prevent cancer, detect cancer at its earliest stages, improve the accessibility and availability of quality cancer treatment, ensure the highest possible quality of life for all Iowans affected by cancer, and eliminate cancer health disparities in our state.

How would you use the priorities and goals from the 2018-2022 Iowa Cancer Plan to guide public policy development as governor of Iowa?

Marco Battaglia, Libertarian

Response provided by candidate: I think we can reduce instances of cancer dramatically by looking at what people consume and by encouraging people to get active. I would also allow people whole plant cannabis freedom. I would treat cannabis in a similar manner to the tomato plant.

State Senator Nate Boulton, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: Public policy should always be informed by research, and I will use the Cancer Plan priorities and goals as a guide to steps in improving cancer research and prevention. I have always advocated to bring as many people to the table as possible when discussing policy, as your first goal outlines. My administration will work towards planning for the next 20 years, not just the next 20 months, and by seeing the big picture of where our state should be, we can address the Cancer Plan goals by ensuring every Iowan has access to affordable health care, where they can consult a physician to receive the education and care they deserve. We must also fully fund our education system, including our institutions which contribute so much to research, to ensure we are training the best physicians in the world and leading with innovative research technologies right here in Iowa. More specifically, I believe we can and should adopt a cancer prevention and early strategic plan for Iowa incorporating the key elements of the Cancer Plan with quantifiable objectives and specific timetables for implementation and standards for measuring our progress.

Cathy Glasson, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: The plan should guide the development of policy on cancer prevention.

Fred Hubbell, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: The cancer plan lays out a good roadmap of steps to address cancer care in Iowa and should be used to inform our approach to improve health care results in general. As governor, I look forward to using the information provided from health experts and medical professionals to invest and expand in the programs and services that best serve Iowans.

Dr. Andy McGuire, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: I will use this plan as a roadmap to boosting cancer treatment, prevention, and research in Iowa. One of my top priorities as governor will be listening to Iowans, who have valuable input on the best ways to improve our state, and getting ideas and feedback from cancer experts will absolutely be part of that process. I will keep in contact with the Iowa Cancer Consortium as we work to implement our goals in the fight against cancer, and will always treat this issue specifically and public health as a whole as a priority. It is also critically important to involve the Iowans who are on the ground doing the hard work to fight cancer across the state. I will ensure we solicit feedback and consider the input and ideas of Iowa’s oncologists, as well as the experts at the Iowa Cancer Registry, the Iowa College of Public Health, the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, and other key organizations and industries so that we can guarantee we are always implementing the best and most cutting edge strategies for Iowans.

John Norris, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: More than 40 Iowa-based health experts have been involved in the development of the Iowa Cancer Plan, either as a steering committee member or a board of director. I appreciate the time and contributions these individuals and others have made to provide the state with an effective roadmap to combat a wide range of cancers. As noted previously, science and research will guide my decisions as governor particularly when it comes to health related matters. This plan will help guide my administration and the relevant state agencies including the Iowa Department of Public Health and the Department of Human Services. As governor, I am committed to having the leaders of these departments meet regularly with the Iowa Cancer Consortium to solicit their advice and work together to make progress on achieving the main objectives of the Iowa Cancer Plan.

Jake Porter, Libertarian

This candidate did not respond.

Kim Reynolds, Republican

This candidate did not respond.

Ross Wilburn, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: As governor, I would change the relationship between our medical & mental health providers and the Office of the Governor. The simple existence of the Iowa Cancer Consortium and Cancer Plan demonstrate that you all know how to innovate. I would direct my Chief of Staff to work with the Consortium to help prioritize specifics from the Cancer Plan and help put an action plan into place for guidance thought the budget, through advocacy in order to get legislation passed, as well as people elected to the legislature that will vote to place bills on my desk for signing into law. There are definite policy areas that I would work towards, but some also need a majority in the Iowa legislature to enact. I would support eliminating the casino exemption in the Smokefree Air Act, which I wish we could have accomplished with the original law. I would work towards requiring that e-cigarettes and similar devices meet the same standards as other tobacco devices. I would promote concepts like participation in “Blue Zones”, which helped make reaching for healthy foods an easier choice when I was part of the team to help Iowa City successfully become a designated Blue Zone. I would view the Iowa Cancer Plan as a parallel to Former Vice-President Biden’s Moon Shot effort to end cancer and would work in partnership with you to achieve and hopefully surpass the 2022 goals.

Return to Top



Candidate Statements

What else would you like Iowans to know about your plans for cancer control and prevention as Iowa’s governor?

Marco Battaglia, Libertarian

Response provided by candidate: I want to phase out subsidies and assistance that allows for more junk food and for people to buy junk food. I think we can reduce instances of cancer dramatically by looking at what people consume and by encouraging people to get active. I would also allow people whole plant cannabis freedom. I would treat cannabis in a similar manner to the tomato plant. So many feed their cancers with diets high in sugar or artificial sweetener. Spreading factual information about cannabis oil and a plant-based diet would help dramatically. 

State Senator Nate Boulton, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: As someone who has lost multiple family members to cancer, and whose mother is a breast cancer survivor, I want Iowans to know that I will do everything I can as governor to make Iowa a leading state in cancer control and prevention policy and will work with all key stakeholders to make sure we fulfill the goals and objectives of the cancer plan as best we can in Iowa.

Cathy Glasson, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: My campaign believes that we need less politicians at the table making life and death choices for Iowans. We will have experts at the table to guide public health policy with a goal of keeping Iowans as healthy as possible.

Fred Hubbell, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: I’ve worked throughout my life to expand access to quality health care, whether as Chair of Planned Parenthood, on the board of Mercy Hospital, or helping Broadlawns Medical Center expand their mental health services, and as governor it will be my key priority from Day One. Using my experience in the public and private sector, I will bring experts together to deliver results, so every Iowan will have access to the quality, affordable care and services they need to lead healthy, successful lives.

Dr. Andy McGuire, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: I’m a doctor and healthcare leader who has a deep background in public health and a close familiarity with the challenges and opportunities in this field. I know the environment, I know the people, and I know the science because I’ve done it through my life. I’ve been involved in breast cancer and bone cancer research. I’ve published articles on cancer and written an entire chapter on the subject. My specialty of nuclear medicine heavily intersected with the cancer treatment and prevention fields. Making Iowa a leader in the fight to prevent cancer and improving our public health will always be a priority for me as governor because it’s been my priority throughout my entire career. It’s time we had an executive with the knowledge, tenacity, and determination to finally get things done that will improve the lives of Iowans.

John Norris, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: Cancer will impact every single Iowan at some point in their life, whether that means being diagnosed personally or seeing a family member diagnosed. This cuts across party lines and should be addressed with wide bipartisan support. As governor, I am committed to working with health officials and policymakers across the state to continue making progress in the fight against cancer. That includes freeing up resources to fund critical cancer related services particularly expanded tobacco cessation initiatives and education programs that raise awareness of self examinations, vaccines that can help prevent certain types of cancer, the importance of healthy lifestyles, sun safety, cancer screenings, treatment options, and more. However, achieving these goals will require investment on the state’s part and to that end we need to build a budget that reflects Iowa values. Corporate tax cuts should not be given higher priority than the health and wellbeing of Iowans. As governor, I will fight every day for patients and providers.

Jake Porter, Libertarian

This candidate did not respond.

Kim Reynolds, Republican

This candidate did not respond.

Ross Wilburn, Democrat

Response provided by candidate: Here’s the truth: As a state, we pay for health issues one way or another. We can choose to do this proactively through a comprehensive system of prevention, screening, treatment and education, or we can pay much more with increasing numbers of tragic preventable deaths and untapped human potential. Race, gender & gender identity, income and other factors shouldn’t dictate whether an Iowan or anyone can get quality health care or benefit from cancer control and prevention. In our state and country, healthy people are essential to our successful future. While I am not a healthcare professional, you at the Consortium said it right in the Iowa Cancer Plan, all Iowans have a role in cancer prevention and control. My mother died of a colorectal cancer in 1985, so when I look at the Incident and Mortality Rate graph in the Cancer Plan, I can pinpoint her exact location in time on that graphic. Like other Iowans whose families have been touched by cancer, it is more than a point on a graph. I want you to know that as Governor, I would take the Iowa Cancer Plan to heart. It’s personal to me and personal to so many Iowans. I took it personal when I worked with “Clean Air for Everyone (CAFE)” to successfully pass a local smoking ban in restaurants ordinance when I was on city council. I took it personal when I served as an elected representative on the Blue Zones committee to successfully get Iowa City designated as a Blue Zone. I take it personal when I participate in fundraising cycling events like the “Courage Ride” in memory of Seth Bailey. I take it personal as a Les Mills group fitness instructor when I teach fitness classes and our motto is to: “Create Life Changing Fitness Experiences, Every time, Everywhere” in order to promote fitness, healthy lifestyles, and fight obesity. If we prioritize cancer control and prevention, we will find we not only have saved Iowa money by focusing on proactive health but more importantly, we also will have allowed a whole group of friends and family members to live a high quality of life and fully live up to their potential. I ask you for your support in the June 5th Democratic primary election and hopefully then again in the November general election. Let’s be Iowa.

Return to Top